TV license: pensioners could still benefit from a free license | Personal Finances | Finance

The automatic right to a TV license for those over 75 ended last August.

The changes made mean that only those over 75 benefiting from a Pension Credit will be entitled to a free license. This change has proven to be particularly controversial.

In February, the BBC announced a transition period until July 31 next Saturday due to the pandemic.

As of last month, of the 3.9 million people who had to make new arrangements for their television licenses, 3.6 million had done so.

The current fee for a standard license is £ 159 per year.

The cost of the fees can be spread by making quarterly or monthly payments and it can be paid in a number of ways, including direct debit.

There are also other ways to get discounts on license fees.

On the one hand, people who are blind or have severe visual impairment can claim a 50 percent reduction on the permit.

People in a nursing home or sheltered accommodation can also apply for a Residential Care Accommodation (ARC) license which costs £ 7.50.

Individuals will only need it if they are watching TV in their own home, rather than watching it in common areas.

Many people are eligible for pension credit but are not currently claiming it.

The Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) estimates that there are around 1.3 million people for whom this is the case.

The Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) estimates that there are around 1.3 million people for whom this is the case.

This means that two in five people who qualify for the pension credit do not receive it.

If someone has paid the license fee but thinks they are entitled to a free license or a discount, they can contact the TV license who can help with refund requests.